Rewards Credit Cards

Updated 24 September 2021

Earn rewards points and get gift cards, score big-ticket items and even free flights when you use a rewards credit card.

Rewards credit card let you earn rewards points when you spend. Each rewards credit card is tied to a rewards program, so you can choose one to earn frequent flyer points, flybuys, gift cards and more.

3 things to know about rewards credit cards:

  • To get the most value out of a rewards credit card, repay it in full each month.
  • See what “earn rate” the card has. This is how many rewards points you’ll earn for each dollar you spend.
  • Rewards credit card often come with high interest rates and annual fees, so the rewards points you earn balance these out.
We’ve found a bunch of rewards credit cards for you to compare below. Use our handy visual comparison tool to see how the card rates. (edited)
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Rewards Credit Cards 101

What is a rewards card exactly? Rewards cards are credit cards that earn points for the money you spend. You can spend your points on a variety of perks and freebies, from flights and accommodation to merchandise and gift cards.

Basically, rewards cards reward you for doing your normal, everyday spending. That’s why in this guide, we’re going to help you understand how reward cards work, and how to make the most out of the bounty they offer.

How do you earn points?

Earning points is as easy as using your card for everyday transactions. If you’re super-savvy, you can use your card for expensive purchases – for example, a flat screen tv or a new couch – and pay it off immediately just for the points.

Here’s how you earn points on your rewards card:

  • Use your card for everyday purchases. The ‘earn rate’ (the points per dollar you receive from your card) is applied to all eligible purchases on your rewards card. The rate is typically 1 point for every $1 you spend but can be higher or a little lower for some rewards cards.
  • Take advantage of sign-up offers. Rewards card providers throw out huge one-off bonus points – as high as 200,000 points, which can equate to hundreds of dollars in real value – when you reach a minimum spend once you’ve signed up. Of course, you need to make sure you’re not overspending to reach the bonus point threshold, which is why it’s important to choose a card that suits your spending habits.
  • Referring friends to sign up. If you’re winning with rewards, you can recommend a rewards card provider to a friend and earn big points if they sign up.

Is a rewards card right for you?

Before we go any further, you need to work out whether a rewards card is the right choice for you. Different cards suit different cardholders, and it’s safe to say rewards cards are not for everyone. Let’s break it down.

Income: Your income is pretty important. It will determine whether you’re eligible for a rewards credit card, and whether you’re eligible for premium card rewards that suit your lifestyle and budget.

Spending Power: You earn points by using your card when you make purchases. If you don’t have the funds to spend on your card and pay it all off each month, it will make it hard to earn enough points to make your card worthwhile.

Repayment Habits: Rewards cards work best for people who pay off their card in full each month. The purchase rate for rewards cards is often higher, which means the interest you’ll pay on your debt could outweigh any rewards you’re earning. Unless you can change your habits, a low rate card would be a better fit.

Spending Habits: By thinking about where you spend the most on your credit card, you can choose the card that best rewards your spending. Think supermarket shopping, travel spending and more.

How do you choose the best rewards card for you?

Rewards cards come in all shapes and sizes, which means you’ll need to find one that works hardest for you. Fortunately, CreditCard.com.au makes it easy to compare the options side-by-side. But, what should you look for when you compare?

Annual Fees

This is a big one. How much you pay in annual fees will directly affect the real-world value of the points you earn. So, how do you weigh up the options?

Step 1. Estimate how much you’ll spend on the card each year.
Step 2. Work out what that spend equates to in points.
Step 3. Take a look at the rewards program to figure out what you would redeem your points on.
Step 4. Calculate the dollar value of that points redemption.
Step 5. Compare that dollar value to the card’s annual fee.

For example, let’s say you spend $7,000 per month on your rewards card with an earning rate of 1 point per $1. After the introductory 12 months, the annual fee is $149.

Over one year, you would accrue 84,000 rewards points. On your rewards cards online store, you see LG Tone Free Wireless Earbuds for 57,000 points, valued at around $200.

Considering the annual fee is $149 and you’ve already redeemed a reward valued at $200 with points to spare, your rewards card has indeed rewarded you well.

Interest

To get the most out of a rewards card, you need to pay it off in full each month, before interest is charged on the balance. If you trust yourself with regular repayments, you don’t need to worry about the interest rate because it should never apply to you.

If you’re not sure how well you can pay off the balance, find a low interest rate credit card instead of a rewards card, or one that offers low purchase rates with limited rewards.

Earn Rate

A card’s earn rate will tell you how many points you’ll earn for each dollar you spend. You may have the same earn rate for all spending, or it may be tiered, like this:

  • Earn 3 points per $1 on supermarket spending.
  • Earn 2 points per $1 on petrol.
  • Earn 1 point per $1 on all other transactions except government spending.
  • Earn 0.5 points per $1 on government spending.

It’s a good idea to check the small print regarding the card’s earn rate, as there may be exceptions on what spending earns points and what doesn’t.

Points Shaping (point-earning thresholds)

Some cards shape points. This means the earn rate drops after you spend a certain amount on the card. So, while you may earn 2 points per $1 up to a spend of $10,000 per month, you will only earn 1 point per $1 for any spending over that amount. If you know you’ll spend more than that amount, points shaping could seriously reduce the value of your potential earn.

Points Caps

Similar to points shaping, points caps place a cap on the number of points earned per month or per year. That means if you spend over a certain amount, you stop earning points on your spending, which again reduces the value of your potential points earn.

Rewards

When comparing rewards cards, don’t forget to look at the rewards on offer. Choosing a card that earns loads of points but doesn’t offer anything you actually want isn’t going to be the right card for you. Consider the rewards the program provides, taking into account the value of rewards on offer with regards to the number of points you have to redeem to enjoy them.

Features

While some rewards cards are pretty basic, others offer the world in features, some free and some with extra costs added.
You may find these extras help to provide more value, but it’s a good idea to weigh up the extra cost of those features in terms of annual fees, and whether you will actually make use of them.
Extra features to look out for:

  • Free travel insurance: some providers offer complimentary travel insurance for rewards card holders. There are a lot of conditions involved, and this feature is usually reserved for platinum cards, but it can be a handy bonus if you’re a frequent traveller.
  • Contactless payment: PayWave, Paypass and digital transactions are pretty much standard these days, but it’s nice to know rewards cards are part of the contactless era. Many of them sync with Apply Pay and Samsung Pay to make checkout even easier.
  • Extra deals: look out for rewards cards that just keep on giving, in the form of discounts on music, fashion, event tickets, travel, dining and movies.

If you want to focus solely on rewards, choose a card that allows you to do that. If you want more features and extras, compare what’s on offer and make sure your points earn still offers value.

How do you redeem your points?

Did you know you could get cash-in-hand for redeeming points? Or a free coffee machine or flight to your favourite city?

You’ll need to check the provider’s rewards program before you apply, because the rewards offers vary for each one. Having said that, the list of perks up for grabs is thrillingly vast.

  • Travel: one of the best perks is discounted – or even free – travel and holiday purchases. You can book accommodation, flights, rental cars, tours and cruises to pretty much anywhere in the world.
  • Retail merchandise: use your points for everyday items at retail stores. Think clothing, homewares, technology and beauty products.
  • Gift cards: some rewards cards allow you to redeem points as gift cards, which gives you the flexibility of using the cash wherever you like (or give it as a gift).
  • Cashback: you might be able to spend your points as money, which can take the form of cash in your pocket, a credit on your rewards card, or a payment towards your annual fee.

To redeem your points, you can:

  • Use the provider’s online rewards store to buy products or gift cards
  • Pay with your points at selected retails stores (and fill in any gaps with cash)
  • Use an eligible travel agency or shop direct with airlines like Qantas and Jetstar

What purchases won’t earn points?

You’ll see the phrase ‘eligible transactions’ a lot in the small print, and that’s because not everything you buy will earn points on your rewards card.

Here’s what most rewards cards won’t give you points for:

  • Cash advances. A cash advance is a withdrawal of money from your credit card, and it attracts immediate interest, but no rewards.
  • Balance transfers. Popping your debt from a credit card onto your rewards card won’t earn any points.
  • BPAY payments. Online BPAY payments don’t count towards point earnings either, unfortunately.
  • Government payments. Most rewards cards won’t accrue points by making payments to the ATO, although a very small selection do. You’ll need to check the rewards program and the small print.

Rewards cards carry a higher annual fee than other card types because the annual fee subsidises the different features that they come with. By using a rewards credit card the idea is the benefits you receive will outweigh the cost of the card as these services and offers would be more expensive if you paid for them separately.

We can’t say which rewards credit card will be best for any particular person or situation, and we do not give financial advice. We do, however, display a range of options on our rewards card table for you to consider and compare based on your own needs and spending habits.

There is no specific amount, and different rewards cards have different minimum income requirements. Some, such as the Citi Rewards card, require $35,000 per year as your minimum income; some may require as much as $100,000. Where minimum income requirements are available and we have access to the relevant information it is displayed on each card’s feature page.

Yes, there is a range of options from the banks; some offer a linked airline account and others their own rewards program. There are also store credit card options, such as Coles, Woolworths or David Jones credit card. With these different types of reward cards, the points earning ratio will likely be different, so you should check this closely on each reward program when comparing.

There are a couple of reasons for this.

1) With two different card options, there is more chance purchases can earn points, because where American Express cards are not accepted Mastercard or Visa can often be used.
2) Apart from the ability to use either credit card more often, American Express often offers the chance to earn more points by using that card.

Yes, some rewards cards come with a balance transfer option. Where there is one available, and we have the relevant information, the balance transfer column of our table will display the promotional balance transfer rate and the features page will include information on the terms of the offer.

For those interested please see here for more specific information on balance transfer credit cards.

Rewards come in a number of forms:

  • Gift vouchers or merchandise – often similar to a department store range – i.e. cosmetics, homewares, kitchen wares, outdoor and sports equipment, electronic goods, gift packages, hampers and more.
  • Cash back offers on purchases
  • Entertainment – live event tickets, movie or theatre tickets or sporting event tickets
  • Travel rewards – such as free flights, points towards air travel, hotel booking, accommodation, rental car services).

Some programs have more than 3000 options to redeem points, so there will almost always be a lot to choose from.

Some credit card reward programs allow you to support a charity via giving up some of the annual fee or points, or to use your points to offset carbon emissions.

If you are interested in airline miles or travel, you could also consider whether a frequent flyer credit card is a better fit for your spending and needs.

A bank’s own rewards program will generally give members access to a selection of its own partner retailers, and will have its own separate points system. For example you may earn two different amounts of points spending the same amount of money with an airline branded frequent flyer campaign versus a bank own branded card. For example 100 St George Amplify points is not the same as 100 Qantas Frequent Flyer points. The bank’s own rewards program may sometimes have higher points value per $1 spent, but the partners may be different. It is worth considering where you spend your money and how you would use your points before deciding which type of rewards program to choose.

There are different types of rewards card designed to suit different types of credit card users – often aimed at the amount of money the customer is likely to spend on the card each year. There are often different tiers of rewards cards, which have more perks as the tiers go up. Many of the banks will offer up to three levels of rewards cards. Standard, platinum, diamond or premium cards are all examples of rewards card tiers. Distinguishing between standard and platinum can be hard, but diamond or premium cards are widely considered the most exclusive.

Some credit cards are also labelled by the bank’s own rewards program, for example Westpac Altitude, or St George Amplify, or CBA Awards. These can fit into any tier depending on the individual card features.

Standard Cards

A standard rewards credit card will typically feature rewards points, however the points per $1 spent earning power may not be as high as for a platinum or diamond card, or may not apply as widely.

Standard rewards cards may also have limited options including travel insurance or purchase protection. In some cases, you can have the option to purchase additional insurances or features such as repayment protection, for an extra fee. The card’s terms and conditions will usually explain this, or you can ask the bank if you already have a rewards card.

Platinum Cards

Platinum credit cards often feature the same types of rewards points as gold cards; however the earning potential per $1 spent may be higher or at least higher with partner retailers compared to standard cards.

Platinum cards can also have features such as global customer service, lower international fees or certain fees waived or further travel insurance cover such as transit accident or flight inconvenience. Generally, these types of cards may include special platinum cardholder offers, or access to tickets or events before others. Many platinum cards also have a higher credit limit than standard cards.

Diamond or ‘Super Premium’ credit cards

The Diamond or ‘super-premium’ credit card is the highest tier of rewards credit cards. These often come with exclusive, executive style perks, outstanding concierge services and special access; however they will also have the highest annual fee and a much higher minimum income requirement than the cards in the lower tiers.

How much you travel, whether you have easy access to rewards partner outlets, how much you spend on your credit card in general and whether you are interested in features such as travel insurance and concierge services can also have an impact.

With so many choices when it comes to redeeming points, it can be hard to work out whether the reward you are thinking of redeeming holds real value. Something worth $50 in the store can be redeemed for a different amount of points depending which rewards program it is with.

There is a neat trick you can do, though, to find out the currency of points to redeem rewards when you know the recommended retail price. The formula can also be applied to different rewards in different points programs. Simply divide the number of points required to redeem the reward by the recommended retail price. This gives you the right idea of points required to redeem $1.

So, for example, to compare a reward’s dollar value, you can look at the number of points required to claim it, and then the standard purchase value of it. If a gift worth 3500 points costs $25 in-store you would divide the number of points required by that value:

3500/$25
=140 points per 1$

You can do this calculation for points in a different reward program when you know the number of points needed to redeem the same reward and the price.

In the example above, 140 per $1 is the real value of the reward, and can give you an indication of whether it makes sense to use points to claim it.

You use a rewards credit card in the same way you would use any other type of card when it comes to making purchases. Choosing when and how often to use your card can make a difference to how many rewards points you end up earning, and how quickly you can redeem points. For more information on this, see ‘what types of rewards cards are there’?

Some rewards programs will advertise ways to earn points by paying regular expenses using your card. This usually involves a direct debit coming out of the credit card account to pay monthly bills.

Other ways people use rewards cards include paying for groceries, petrol and everyday expenses using the card (some even have their rent come out to classify as a direct debit). People who do this are always disciplined and pay off the full balance of the card each month, however. Leaving an unpaid balance on a rewards credit card can mean that some or all of the value in holding the card is wiped out when purchases attract an interest charge.

Some people decide that they only want to earn points towards air miles with their credit card, so they choose a Frequent Flyer card with airline points and sometimes other travel related perks as a package.

You should consider how much you are likely to spend on a card per year, and the points value per $1 spent, as defined in ‘How do I work out what rewards points are worth, and whether individual rewards are worth it?’ when comparing rewards credit cards and thinking about how you are likely to use one. The annual fee on some of these cards may mean that some cardholders don’t get enough value versus the cost of their card.

Not necessarily, however a range of credit cards with rewards programs will let you earn points for paying BPay bills using that card. This is something you need to check in the credit card terms and conditions for the card you have.

The expiration of your rewards points depends entirely on the provider. Some offer no expiry date on points, some lapse unless you redeem at least some points within a certain timeframe, and others will disappear entirely if there’s no action on your account.

It’s important to check the expiry policy of your provider, particularly if your goal is to amass a large amount of points for travel, for example.

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39 questions (showing the latest 10 Q&As)

Peter

Peter

21 September 2021
Hi Roland, we are part pensioners and spend approx 5000 per month on our 2 latitude cards. The rewards program finishes shortly we are looking for something similar. Woolworths card seems ideal as we spend at least 1000 a month there but they won't issue new cards at the moment. Is there something similar to Latitude, we bank with a credit union so a bank may not be the answer. Peter
Sarah

Sarah

7 September 2021
I am new to credit cards, I would like to find one that I can use to collect points but not incur too many fees. I own a business and we make daily truck fuel purchases.
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    8 September 2021
    Hi Sarah, there’s many nuances to credit cards, and especially if you’re going to be using them for your business. Depending on whether you want a personal credit card or a business credit card, you’ll need to decide on whether you’ll use the majority for business and if you need accounting software integration. Another consideration is what rewards program you want to join. Currently the American Express Qantas Business Rewards Card has no first year annual fee, a stack of bonus points when you meet the required spend and triple Qantas Points for your business on eligible Qantas flights. You just need to clear the balance in full each billing cycle. If you’re looking to start a comparison you can use our handy comparison tool above the cards and put in your estimated spend and see how many points you may earn. Best of luck in your credit card search!
Patrick toni

Patrick toni

23 August 2021
Apply for flybys card
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    24 August 2021
    Hi Patrick, you can check out our guide to supermarket rewards to learn more about flybuys credit cards. Let us know what card you decide on.
Suzanne

Suzanne

30 May 2021
I am buying a new car and wondering credit card would offer the best benefits for this large single purchase.
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    31 May 2021
    Hi Suzanne, thank you for your unique question. Whilst using a credit card to finance a purchase like a car can unlock benefits such as interest free terms, and rewards points, it’s important to understand both sides of the decision. Credit card debt can accumulate quickly, and comes with a higher interest rate than car and personal loans. Your credit limit also may not cover the cost of the car. Thanks again for your comment.
Kath

Kath

7 May 2021
I had this offer n card 1 month ago... then I cancelled this card .. if I apply again . Do I still have this offer ? Thank you
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    10 May 2021
    Hi Kath, there's usually a clause with banks where you can't have held an account for a certain period of time before you can re-apply and get the reward. For example if you've had an Amex card in the preceding 18 months, you won't get the bonus points offer. It's a good idea to compare cards with rewards programs that you haven't held for some time. Hope that helped!
Jenny

Jenny

21 October 2020
Hi Roland. I spend about $4500/ month on my current credit card, but have to change banks. My options are either ANZ or Adelaide bank/Bendigo. I would pay it off each month so interest rate is not really a factor. I don’t travel a lot. Which card/bank would be best for me?
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    21 October 2020
    Hi Jenny, it is going depend on what type of rewards you are keen for. ANZ Frequent Flyer Black has just bumped up its bonus points and cash back. If Qantas points are not your thing. Then you could look at the flexibility of the ANZ Rewards Black. Again this offer just improved yesterday. The Bendigo cards have much lower reward point earning and bonus points. If the high-end ANZ cards don't work, you can look at the Platinum versions. In the end, the best card for you will be based on what features you could actually use. Reach out with any further questions.
BEN

BEN

9 July 2020
I need to compare 2 cards but the favourite toll keeps saying no cards selected when I click on it
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    9 July 2020
    Hi Ben, thanks for reaching out. Yes we have had some problems if you are incognito or private browser mode. Just not being able to add. What cards are you looking to compare? How much a month do you think you will spend on average?
Rob

Rob

6 February 2020
I'm looking for a no frills cashback reward credit card, offering at least 1% cashback, low annual fee, preferably unlimited cashback. but will consider capped if it's a decent level. I had such a card, $45 pa fee, until my credit union restructured and replaced it with a low interest card instead. I pay the outstanding amount every month so interest rate is largely immaterial. I'm on the hunt for a replacement. I am finding it hard to cut through all the fluff on card finder sites to find the simple financial facility I am after. Thanks in advance.
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    7 February 2020
    Hi Rob, very few cards deliver cash back. Many are offering a once off cash back but its not the same. Have a look at the ING Orange One Platinum. The cap is a low $30 a month though. Not sure how much you spend a month and whether this could be a good replacement.
GMA

GMA

29 August 2019
Hi I currently have 2 credit cards neither of which provide any rewards. I am now traveling overseas 2-3 times per year as well as interstate a couple of time a year. Ian a self funded retiree and have no debts oand pay my credit card off each month . I have a regular income of approx 36000 from superannuation and a further $20000 from investments yet have just been rejected for a virgin card. Can you recommend who and which card I may be eligible for?
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    30 August 2019
    Hi GMA, Virgin is issued through Citi. Citi have been tight of approvals lately. 2 cards I think of. The HSBC Platinum Qantas with a great earn rate and both domestic and international insurance. Then check out the ANZ Rewards Travel Adventure. This is a great card for travelers with no foreign fees. Saving you 3% on purchases in a different currency. Plus has some decent bonus points and points earning. Can cash advance in debit overseas with no fees as well. ANZ are a good bank that should be able to see your situation clearly. Before applying I would look to cancel at least one of your other cards. They max these cards out now. Then see if you can pay off in 3 years. Depending on your limits, this can be a real downer on your application.
David

David

16 July 2019
Hey Roland, I'm looking at rewards credit cards, to redeem points for flights.. But there is SO MANY, where do i start, my man ? The different programs, with different values for points is confusing . Please help.. I'd like a lowish annual fee, under $200, or there abouts. A no interest period and big bonus points would be awesome ! thank you for your time Ro bro. Cheers, David
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    17 July 2019
    Hi David, its going to depend on what airline program you like to fly. Qantas or Virgin are the 2 main choices. Depending on which one or network you want to use. Then this will guide your choice. For bonus points and annual fee in the Velocity earning. I like the Virgin Flyer bonus points offer. The ANZ Frequent Flyer black offer with 100k Qantas points and $200 rebate. Brings the 1st year annual fee back to $225. This would be the best bonus v annual fee offer. Go to our frequent flyer section. You can filter by rewards program. https://www.creditcard.com.au/frequent-flyer-credit-cards/
pauline baxter

pauline baxter

17 June 2019
i wish to change my email address and why does this email address be shown when prior to entering it states this email will not be displayed?
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    17 June 2019
    Change what email address? No ones email address is displayed that asks a question. You can see this clearly on each page. Only the display name is used on the site, with the Q+A. Have can I assist you? If you want a previous question deleted. Just let me know what page and the question if possible.
Madalyne

Madalyne

23 January 2019
Hi I am wanting to apply for a credit card, what would be the best to apply for if I have a low credit rating?
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    24 January 2019
    Hi Madalyne, have a look at the ANZ First. This would be one of the easier cards to get approved for with low minimum requirements. If you are approved, then with good use, your credit will build. Then you can upgrade to a card that would more suit your needs.
Laurie

Laurie

10 December 2018
I have a Comm-bank visa & Comm-bank master spend approx $20k VISA $6k Master have accumulated pasted 7 years 83,931 rewards on Visa, nil rewards paid on Master. Have been with them 25+ years, is there a better option?
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    11 December 2018
    Hi Laurie, there are so many better options out there than the low rewards on offer from Commbank. Firstly if you can use an AMEX, you can earn Qantas or Velocity points with no annual fee. If you could let me know what type of rewards you are after I can more refine suggestions for you. Have a look at these rewards cards with bonus points.
Elena

Elena

13 November 2018
I am looking for a card that will give me gold Hilton honours status. what would be the best card?
Kumar

Kumar

7 June 2018
Hi Roland, Currently I have Citi Signature card and Westpac Altitude Black Master card. For both I dont pay any annual fee. My average monthly spending is 1500. Which card gives me more rewards points and benefits. Thanks Kumar
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    7 June 2018
    Hi Kumar, if you are not paying an annual fee for either. Then it sounds like you might as well keep both. Your spend is not large. What it is going to come down to is the reward programs themselves and which you like better. Additionally the signature card has a tiered points structure. Earn 2 Points per $1 for selected domestic purchases made and booked directly from a range of major: restaurants and restaurant chains, hotel chains and airlines (flights only). Earn 1.5 Points per $1 for selected domestic purchases made at major: petrol outlets, supermarkets and national retailers. Earn 1 Points per $1 spent everywhere else on Domestic Eligible Transactions. Therefore if you are spending mainly where you can earn 1.5-2 points per $1 this could be better. What I say though is that you should review both the reward programs. Look at what the same amount of points get you for each one. Then revert back to how many points you approx each will deliver.
Jeremy Grover

Jeremy Grover

7 March 2018
Hi Roland, I currently have Westpac Altitude Business cards, one Visa and the other Amex. Westpac are now closing all Westpac issued Amex cards. What would be your advice for replacement of the Amex card ? My annual spend on the Amex card is around $30K pa, my wife and I travel o/s at least twice pa so earning points is a priority. I wouldn't want the use of points tied to any particular airline. I'd like to know points earned for general purchases, restaurants etc, the limit on monthly spend for earning points, and what is the annual fee. I would pay the balance off each month by automatic debit from my bank a/c. Looking forward to receiving your recommendation Jerry
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    8 March 2018
    Hi Jeremy, for a business AMEX, have a look at the Explorer card with 100k Bonus points. It has a high annual fee of $395 but with the bonus points and other features its definitely worth a try at least for a year. It has good insurance plus lounge access in Sydney at the AMEX lounge. These all could be points that make the annual fee more workable. Let me know if the annual fee is way to much to give it a try. Also let me know if you can use non-business credit cards as an option. You can review the full range of AMEX cards available here.
tony

tony

6 September 2017
hi I have a virgin money visa spend about $7000 to $10000 per month looking for the best rewards card for me don't realy go overseas fly local once or twice per year
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    6 September 2017
    Hi Tony, that spend can bring you some nice rewards. I would suggest the Westpac Altitude Black or ANZ Black Rewards offerings. Really its going to come down to what program you like better. Check out the Altitude Rewards program and also the ANZ rewards program. This way you can compare which program has the kind of rewards you are after. Both are very flexible and can offer you travel as well. I myself have the Westpac Altitude Black.
Kim

Kim

28 August 2017
Hi Roland, reward preference would be for cash back, shopping (had CBA reward card previously) such as household goods or flybuys. Not greatly interested in travel or hotel rewards, thanks Kim
Kim

Kim

24 August 2017
Hello Roland I'm not happy with our BoQ card underwritten by Citibank after the way they handled a fraud incident. My partner & I spend $4 - $6K /mth on our card & pay the full amt ea month. We would like a no or low fee card w rewards. Fraud detection is important & would prefer to be with one of the big 4.
    Roland B Bleyer - CreditCard.com.au Founder

    Roland

    25 August 2017
    Hi Kim, what type of rewards are you after? Qantas points? Velocity? Or anything else specific?
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